Welsh Folklore

In Welsh Folk-Lore (1887), author Elias Owen explains one procedure to use a ladybird to foretell the weather:

First of all the lady-bird was placed in the palm of the left hand, or right; I do not think it made any difference which hand was used, and the person who held it addressed it as follows –

Lady-bird, lady-bird, tell to me

What the weather is going to be

If fair, then fly in the air,

If foul, then fall to the ground.

The first two lines were said with the beetle in the hand, and the last two whilst it was thrown upwards; if it came to the ground without attempting to fly, it indicated rain; if, however, when thrown into the air it flew away, then fair weather was to be expected. The writer has often resorted to this test, but whether he found it true or false he cannot now say.

This wonderful looking beetle was formerly used around Llanidloes, as a foreteller of the weather.  The ladybird was put into the palm of the hand, and then this was recited:

“Iâr fach goch, gwtta, Pa un ai glaw, neu hindda”

The ladybird was then thrown into the air with the person repeating:

 “ Os mai gwlaw, cwympa lawr, Os mai têg, hedfana”

Which roughly translated means:

“Lady-bird, lady-bird, tell to me,

What the weather is going to be.

If fair, then fly in the air,

If foul, then fall to the ground”

The first two lines were told whilst holding the ladybird in the hand, the last two as it was being thrown upwards.  If it fell to the ground without flying it meant rain.  If it flew away, then good weather was on the way.

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